Why it Makes Sense for Obama to Authorize Airstrikes in Iraq — but not Syria

The U.S. is gearing up for a military intervention in Iraq. That does not mean it should do the same in Syria.
Displaced families from the minority Yazidi sect seek refuge from ISIS violence in mosul.
Displaced families from the minority Yazidi sect seek refuge from ISIS violence in mosul. (REUTERS/Ari Jalal)

Whenever President Obama makes a major foreign policy move, as he did last night announcing limited airstrikes in Iraq, it’s inevitable that someone will ask, “Well, what about [X country that is also mired in conflict]?” The go-to example is Syria, where innocent civilians are being killed in the thousands in a full-blown civil war that the Obama administration has long kept at arm’s length.

But the Iraq mission is special. As Obama made clear, this authorization of force has modest goals: 1) to protect U.S. personnel in the Kurdish city of Erbil and 2) to facilitate a humanitarian mission for 40,000 Yazidi Iraqis who are trapped without food or water and face imminent slaughter at the hands of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria. There is no equivalent situation in Syria with such clear, executable goals.

Furthermore, the Iraqi government is a U.S. ally, as is the regional government in Kurdistan, where the latest action is happening. The U.S. has an interest in bolstering the regime and keeping it together; that is not the case in Syria. While Obama said he would prefer the Iraqi government to take the lead in this endeavor, the U.S.’s hand was forced after ISIS took advantage of gridlock in Baghdad to sow chaos in Kurdistan, which had once been an oasis of stability in Iraq.

Finally, the U.S. is partly to blame for the situation in Iraq. This is what happens when you recklessly invade other countries.

Could these airstrikes be the beginning of a slippery slope, drawing the U.S. into the kind of morass it has sought to avoid in Syria? Perhaps. But at the moment, the two countries represent distinct foreign policy challenges for the administration.

Popcorn Time FREE Movies on Android Through Netflix !!!!

Download here !!!

Popcorn Time users who get their Netflix-style pirated movie fix on Android devices will be extremely happy to hear that the “company” has come up with a brand new version of its Android app that brings some awesome features to the table.

Popcorn Time for Android has reached Android beta 2.1, which brings built-in VPN support, a feature that can help out with hiding your torrent streaming traces, but also support for a vast majority of devices.

In fact, starting with Android beta 2.1, Popcorn Time will work with smartphones and tablets running Android 4.0 or later (rather than Android 4.2, the previous minimum OS requirements).

Moreover, the developers have further tweaked the app’s performance, improving Chromecast functionality, as well as movie loading times.

“The whole experience is much smoother,” developers say, “and we also fixed many minor annoying bugs while we were at it.

Finally, a Popcorn Time version for iOS will be here “soon,” developers say.

To download the new Android app beta version, check the source link below – but also remember that Popcorn Time is still a service that enables movie piracy, and using it may get you in trouble, so make sure you understand how it works before proceeding.

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Ebola’s Spread to US is ‘Inevitable’ Says CDC Chief

Ebola’s spread to the United States is “inevitable” due to the nature of global airline travel, but any outbreak is not likely to be large, US health authorities said Thursday.

Already one man with dual US-Liberian citizenship has died from Ebola, after becoming sick on a plane from Monrovia to Lagos and exposing as many as seven other people in Nigeria.

More cases of Ebola moving across borders via air travel are expected, as West Africa faces the largest outbreak of the hemorrhagic virus in history, said Tom Frieden, the head of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The virus spreads by close contact with bodily fluids and has killed 932 people and infected more than 1,700 since March in Sierra Leone, Guinea, Nigeria and Liberia.

“It is certainly possible that we could have ill people in the US who develop Ebola after having been exposed elsewhere,” Frieden told a hearing of the House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights and International Organizations.

“We are all connected and inevitably there will be travelers, American citizens and others who go from these three countries — or from Lagos if it doesn’t get it under control — and are here with symptoms,” he said.

“But we are confident that there will not be a large Ebola outbreak in the US.”

There is no treatment or vaccine for Ebola, but it can be contained if patients are swiftly isolated and adequate protective measures are used, he said.

Healthcare workers treating Ebola patients should wear goggles, face masks, gloves and protective gowns, according to CDC guidelines.

- Equipment lacking -

However, Ken Isaacs, vice president of program and government relations at the Christian aid group Samaritan’s Purse warned that the world is woefully ill-equipped to handle the spread of Ebola.

“The international response to the disease has been a failure.”

Samaritan’s Purse arranged the medical evacuation of US doctor Kent Brantly and days later, missionary Nancy Writebol, from Monrovia to a sophisticated Atlanta hospital.

Both fell ill with Ebola while treating patients in the Liberian capital, and their health is now improving.

“One of the things that I recognized during the evacuation of our staff is that there is only one airplane in the world with one chamber to carry a level-four pathogenic disease victim,” Isaacs said.

He also said personal protective gear is hard to find in Liberia, and warned of the particular danger of kissing the corpse farewell during funeral rites.

“In the hours after death with Ebola, that is when the body is most infectious because the body is loaded with the virus,” he said.

“Everybody that touches the corpse is another infection.”

- Traveler cases -

Ebola can cause fever, muscle aches, vomiting, diarrhea and bleeding. It has been fatal in about 55 percent of cases during this outbreak.

Last month, Patrick Sawyer, a Liberian finance ministry employee who was also a naturalized American citizen, brought the virus to Lagos.

Sawyer had traveled to Nigeria from Liberia via Togo’s capital Lome, and was visibly sick upon arrival at the international airport in Lagos on July 20.

He died in quarantine on July 25.

As many as seven people who had close contact with Sawyer have fallen ill with Ebola, Nigeria’s Health Minister Onyebuchi Chukwu said.

One of them, a nurse, died on Tuesday.

Frieden said helping West African nations screen passengers who are departing airports could help contain the virus.

A Saudi Arabian man who had recently traveled to Sierra Leone and showed Ebola-like symptoms died Wednesday of a heart attack, but authorities in Riyadh did not reveal the results of Ebola tests that were done on the man.

Ebola first emerged in 1976, and has killed more than 1,500 people since then. Within weeks, the death toll from this outbreak alone is expected to surpass that number.

10 Things You Need to Know Today: August 6, 2014

A U.S. general is killed in Afghanistan, Utah appeals to the Supreme Court to restore its gay marriage ban, and more
The walls of the military base where U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Harold Greene was shot and killed.
The walls of the military base where U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Harold Greene was shot and killed. (AP Photo/Massoud Hossaini)

1. American general killed in an apparent insider attack in Afghanistan
U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Harold Greene was shot and killed in Kabul on Tuesday in an apparent insider attack by a member of the Afghan armed forces. Greene was the highest ranking member of the U.S. military killed in the line of duty since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Greene, 55, was a key figure in the training of Afghan security forces, and he was making a routine visit to a training center when he was shot. [The Washington Post]

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2. Utah takes its defense of its gay marriage ban to the Supreme Court
Utah on Tuesday became the first state to ask the U.S. Supreme Court to rule on its bid to save its same-sex marriage ban. The voter-approved ban was ruled unconstitutional by a federal judge and an appeals court. If the Supreme Court declines to hear the appeal, the appeals court ruling will stand and gay marriage will be legal in its jurisdiction, which includes Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Utah, and Wyoming. [The Salt Lake Tribune]

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3. Russian gang pulls off record heist of internet security data
Security researchers say that a Russian crime ring has pulled off the largest theft ever of internet security information, collecting the user names and passwords of 1.2 billion users. The confidential personal data, along with 500 million email addresses, was stolen from 420,000 websites, including both well-known sites and smaller ones, according to Hold Security, which discovered the credential theft. [The New York Times]

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4. Businessman ousts Tea Party-aligned Rep. Kerry Bentivolio in GOP primary
House establishment Republicans got a lift after former majority leader Eric Cantor’s June primary loss, when businessman Dave Trott beat Tea Party-aligned Rep. Kerry Bentivolio in Michigan’s 11th District on Tuesday. Trott won in an apparent landslide, taking 66 percent of the vote with 60 percent of precincts reporting. In Kansas, Sen. Pat Roberts defeated a Tea Party challenger in what might have been hard-liners’ last chance to oust an incumbent GOP senator this year. [Politico, The New York Times]

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5. Gaza truce holds on its first day
The latest three-day cease-fire between Israel and Hamas held early Wednesday, its second day, as negotiators in Cairo prepared to start indirect talks on ending the month-long Gaza conflict. Both Israel and Hamas claimed victory. Israeli military officials said they had accomplished their mission by destroying tunnels used by Palestinian militants to attack Israel. Hamas said the casualties it inflicted on Israeli forces showed the limits of Israel’s power. [The Associated Press, Los Angeles Times]

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6. Missouri carries out first execution since prolonged lethal injection in Arizona
Missouri executed inmate Michael Worthington by lethal injection on Wednesday for the 1995 rape and murder of a Lake St. Louis woman. Worthington was the first U.S. inmate put to death since a controversial execution in Arizona last month in which the condemned man was given 15 doses of lethal drugs and was not pronounced dead until two hours after the execution began. [The Associated Press]

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7. Sprint abandons T-Mobile takeover bid
Sprint has given up on taking over T-Mobile, ending the No. 3 mobile phone carrier’s attempt to create a major challenger to Verizon Wireless and AT&T. T-Mobile was reportedly willing to move forward if several sticking points on the financial structure of a deal could be resolved, but both companies doubted regulators would approve the deal because of concerns about competition. [Bloomberg Businessweek]

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8. Tour buses collide in Times Square, injuring 14
Fourteen people were injured in New York City’s Times Square when two double-decker sightseeing buses crashed into each other. Most of the victims were pedestrians with minor injuries — the buses were empty except for the drivers and one tour guide. One of the people injured was a baby in a stroller. Police arrested one of the drivers, charging him with driving while impaired. [CBS News, The Associated Press]

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9. Argentine grandmother finds grandson 36 years after his abduction
A grandmother in Argentina says she has found the grandson who was taken from her daughter shortly before she was executed by the military dictatorship of the 1970s. Estela Barnes de Carlotto, founder of the human rights group Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo, said the now 36-year-old man — identified by Argentine media as pianist and composer Ignacio Hurban — had questions about his identity and came forward to have a DNA test. [The Guardian]

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10. Spurs hire former WNBA star Becky Hammon as assistant coach
The NBA champion San Antonio Spurs announced Tuesday that they had hired six-time WNBA All-Star Becky Hammon as assistant coach. Hammon is not the first woman to join an NBA team’s coaching staff — Lisa Boyer worked for the Cleveland Cavaliers in 2001-2002 — but her high-profile job is still being called historic. Hammon downplayed the significance of her success, saying other women had “trail-blazed the path.” [CNN]

Twenty-one Questions About the Ebola Virus

#1) How can U.S. health authorities claim there is zero risk from Ebola patients being treated in U.S. hospitals when those same hospitals can’t control superbug infections? “Many hospitals are poorly prepared to contain any pathogen. That’s why at least 75,000 people a year die from hospital infections. If hospitals can’t stop common infections like MRSA, C. diff and VRE, they can’t handle Ebola.” – Fox News (1)

#2) Why should we trust the CDC’s handling of Ebola when the agency can’t even keep track of its anthrax, avian flu and smallpox samples?

#3) Why were Ebola victims transported to cities in the USA when they could be given state-of-the-art medical care overseas? “Now, they are bringing in highly infectious patients into this nation that is Ebola-free. In doing so, they are violating the primary rule of contagion: isolation.” – Radio host Michael Savage (2)

#4) Why is the company working on Ebola vaccines — Tekmira — receiving money from Monsanto and considers Monsanto to be one of its important business partners? (3)

#5) If Ebola is “not a threat” to U.S. citizens as government authorities keep claiming, then why did the U.S. Department of Defense spend $140 million on an Ebola-related contract with the Tekmira company?

#6) If Ebola is not a threat to the U.S., then why did the Department of Defense deploy Ebola detection equipment to all 50 states? (4)

#7) Why did President Obama just sign a new executive order authorizing the government arrest and quarantine of Americans who show symptoms of respiratory infections? (5)

The language of his new executive order states that government officials may forcibly detain and quarantine people with:

…diseases that are associated with fever and signs and symptoms of pneumonia or other respiratory illness, are capable of being transmitted from person to person, and that either are causing, or have the potential to cause, a pandemic, or, upon infection, are highly likely to cause mortality or serious morbidity if not properly controlled.

#8) How can we trust a government to tell us the truth about Ebola when that same government repeatedly lies about Swine Flu, influenza, Fukushima radiation, weather control technology, the security of the border and seemingly everything else?

#9) If U.S. doctors claim to be so incredibly careful around Ebola that the virus could not possibly escape from the containment rooms at Emory University, then how did the American doctors being treated there contract Ebola in the first place? Weren’t they also being careful?

#10) How are U.S. doctors and health workers supposed to even identify people with Ebola when they appear “fit and healthy” right until the very end? “What’s shocking is how healthy the patients look before they die and how quickly they decline. A number of the Ebola patients I’ve seen look quite fit and healthy and can be walking around until shortly before their deaths.” – Dr. Oliver Johnson (6)

#11) If Ebola is not spread through the air as some claim, then why do doctors who treat Ebola patients always wear masks?

#12) If hospitals are good at infection control, then why did so many SARS victims contract the infection while sitting in waiting rooms at hospitals? “A government report later concluded that for the hospital overcome by SARS, ‘infection control was not a high priority.’ Eventually, 77% of the people who contracted SARS there got it while working, visiting or being treated in a hospital.” – Fox News (7)

#13) If Ebola escapes from patients at Emory University and begins to infect the public, do you think we would ever be told the truth about it? Or instead, would the official story claim that “Ebola terrorists” let it loose?

#14) WHO BENEFITS FROM AN EBOLA OUTBREAK in the USA? This is a key question to ask, and the answers are obvious: the CDC, vaccine manufacturers and pharma companies, and anyone in government who wants to declare a police state and start rounding people up for quarantine in a medical emergency.

#15) We already know there are powerful people who openly promote population reduction (Bill Gates, Ted Turner, etc.) Is a staged Ebola outbreak possibly a deliberate population reduction plan by some group that doesn’t value human life and wants to rapidly reduce the population?

#16) Why are U.S. health authorities intentionally concealing from the public the true number of possible Ebola victims in U.S. hospitals who are being tested for Ebola right now? “In an apparent attempt to avoid hysteria, U.S. health authorities are withholding details about a number of suspected Ebola victims from the public.” – Paul Joseph Watson, Infowars (8)

#17) If Ebola infections are so easy to control (as is claimed by U.S. health authorities), then why are Ebola victim bodies being openly dumped in the streets in West Africa? “Relatives of Ebola victims in Liberia defied government quarantine orders and dumped infected bodies in the streets as West African governments struggled to enforce tough measures to curb an outbreak…” – Reuters (9)

#18) Why do many locals in Sierra Leone truly believe the recent Ebola outbreak was deliberately caused by government officials? “Ebola is a new disease in Sierra Leone and when the first cases emerged, many people thought it might be a government conspiracy to undermine certain tribal groups, steal organs or get money from international donors…” – The Daily Mail (6)

#19) Given that the U.S. government has already funded outrageous medical experiments on Americans and foreigners (see the NIH-funded Guatemalan medical experiments), why should we not believe the government is capable of deploying Ebola in bioweapons experiments in West Africa?

#20) Given that many vaccines accidentally cause the disease they claim to prevent (due to weakened viruses still remaining active in a small number of vaccine vials), isn’t it likely that Ebola vaccines might actually cause Ebola infections in some percentage of those receiving them? How can we trust any vaccines when vaccine manufacturers have been granted absolute legal immunity from faulty products or failures in quality control?

#21) How can we trust a medical system that continues to put mercury in flu shots, refuses to recommend vitamin D to cancer patients and has been criminally corrupted to the point where drug companies are routinely charged with felony crimes for bribery and price fixing?

Sources for this article include:
(1) http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2014/08/04/ma…

(2) http://www.wnd.com/2014/08/ebola-madness-is-…

(3) http://www.naturalnews.com/046290_ebola_pate…

(4) http://www.naturalnews.com/046259_ebola_outb…

(5) http://www.policestateusa.com/2014/executive…

(6) http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-27…

(7) http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2014/08/04/ma…

(8) http://www.infowars.com/u-s-health-authoriti…

(9) http://news.yahoo.com/bodies-dumped-streets-…

WHO: Ebola Death Toll Reaches 932; 1,700 Cases

The World Health Organization says the death toll from the Ebola outbreak in West Africa has risen to 932.

The new figures come Wednesday as authorities in Nigeria confirmed the death of a nurse of Ebola. Saudi Arabia also announced one death of a person with Ebola-like symptoms.

The outbreak emerged in March in Guinea and shows no sign of slowing down. Most of the new deaths are coming from Liberia and Sierra Leone.

There now have been 363 deaths in Guinea, 282 in Liberia, 286 in Sierra Leone and one confirmed death in Nigeria, according to WHO’s statistics as of Aug. 4.